Championing the cause of every eye-glazing baby bore is the Czech pianist Beata Hlavenková, who eschews the new parent’s predilection for showering friends with hard drives of digital footage of (and Facebook invites from) their cabbage-like newborn, instead channelling the deep wellspring of maternal feeling into twelve compositions for piano that are as elegant as flowing water and vivacious as eager children as they follow the mood of the season from the gradual thaw of ‘Ianouarios’ to the twinkling cascades of darkening ‘Dekemvrios’. The months are those of the first year of her second son, Theodor Eli (meaning ‘God’s gift’) during which period – if the ears serve as adequate indicators – time took on a deep, new significance for her.

The set maintains the maternal mood of Hlavenková’s previous recording, Joy for Joel (for her first son), albeit from a solo perspective, though it leaves us all longing for a larger family. She demonstrates throughout, remarkable poise between exuberance and introspection, technical virtuosity and stylistic simplicity, conservatory and spontaneity, the pieces showcasing her exquisite timing, delicacy and command of the keys in myriad styles from minimalism to Debussy-esque impressionism with touches of jazz among the many details revealed with each listen. Housed in a handsome calendar with images of extracted piano parts, the album’s context is complete and compelling, and nothing is overdone in deed or sentiment, making it safe to conclude that Hlavenková’s gift is our gift also.http://www.thesoundprojector.com/?s=beata+hlavenkova

Championing the cause of every eye-glazing baby bore is the Czech pianist Beata Hlavenková, who eschews the new parent’s predilection for showering friends with hard drives of digital footage of (and Facebook invites from) their cabbage-like newborn, instead channelling the deep wellspring of maternal feeling into twelve compositions for piano that are as elegant as flowing water and vivacious as eager children as they follow the mood of the season from the gradual thaw of ‘Ianouarios’ to the twinkling cascades of darkening ‘Dekemvrios’. The months are those of the first year of her second son, Theodor Eli (meaning ‘God’s gift’) during which period – if the ears serve as adequate indicators – time took on a deep, new significance for her.

The set maintains the maternal mood of Hlavenková’s previous recording, Joy for Joel (for her first son), albeit from a solo perspective, though it leaves us all longing for a larger family. She demonstrates throughout, remarkable poise between exuberance and introspection, technical virtuosity and stylistic simplicity, conservatory and spontaneity, the pieces showcasing her exquisite timing, delicacy and command of the keys in myriad styles from minimalism to Debussy-esque impressionism with touches of jazz among the many details revealed with each listen. Housed in a handsome calendar with images of extracted piano parts, the album’s context is complete and compelling, and nothing is overdone in deed or sentiment, making it safe to conclude that Hlavenková’s gift is our gift also.

 

Recenze Theodoros – The Sound Projector (GB)

 

Pasts and Presence